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SEARCH 3 (1) 2011


Computer-Mediated Communication and Organisational Communication: The Use of New Communication Technology in the Workplace
Lee Cheng Ean

Abstract:

The evolution of new communication technologies since the 21st century has dramatically changed organisational communication processes. Many companies have begun to treat new communication technologies as an important investment for creating a new paradigm for workplace communication. This is because powerful and effective communication will motivate a workforce to contribute to the company’s financial success. This paper examines the use of computer-mediated communication (CMC) as a communication platform in the workplace. The main objectives are to gauge the use of CMC by employees in five Malaysian organisations and to appraise the value and effectiveness of CMC as a communication platform in the workplace. A qualitative research method was adopted. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with communications employees from five private organisations in the Klang Valley, Malaysia. The participation of the respondents was voluntary. The results obtained are manifold: the participants use CMC, face-to-face communication, electronic and print media in their workplace; email and instant messaging are frequently used for communication with superiors and among colleagues, and for remote dissemination of work-related information to a vast number of organisational members in different time zones; and lastly, the participants perceive email as an effective and efficient communication tool in the organisation. The findings indicate that although CMC has been frequently used as a communication platform in the workplace, it has yet to replace traditional communication channels such as face-to-face and print media as effective organisational communication channels.

Keywords: Computer-mediated communication, new communication technology, organisational communication

Pages: 1-12 | First Published: 1 March 2011

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SEARCH 3 (1) 2011


Openings and Closings in Front Counter Transactions of Malaysian Government Hospitals
* Kuang Ching Hei, Maya Khemlani David, Lau Su Kia & Ang Pei Soo

Abstract:

This paper focuses on two aspects of social interactions: openings and closings. It examines the public transactions occurring between front counter Malay staff and clients/patients seeking services in Malaysian government hospitals. Openings and closings are important features of face-to-face interactions because both elements suggest that acknowledgement and recognition of another party have been fulfilled. They also indicate that respect and courteousness are present. Greetings are signs of a social encounter taking place. However, they will only occur under particular ‘socio-historical’ conditions. In this study, the use of openings and closings by front counter staff of various departments in six public (government) Malaysian hospitals were studied. From a total of 146 instances of transactions, only 68 of them contained openings made by staff while 46 contained closings contributed by staff. Analysis of data suggests that front counter staff of Malaysian hospitals used less openings and closings in their public transactions with patients/clients and due to that missing element, they could be described as being less polite than expected.

Keywords: Closings, front counters, Malay, openings, polite, public hospitals

Pages: 13-30 | First Published: 1 March 2011

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“Vote for me!”: A Content Analysis of News Reports Leading to the 12th General Election Political Communication
* Wong Fei Mun & Lean Mei Li

Abstract:

The political tsunami that occurred on 8 March 2008 sent shock waves throughout Malaysia. It was an unexpected turn of events that many thought of as a dream or nightmare, depending on who was having the dream. Thus, this study looks into how the politicians from all parties used the media to convey messages across to the media consumers in order to influence the public to vote for them. Specifically, this study considers the issues that were raised by the politicians and picked up by the media. The investigation of the present study is undertaken using the theoretical framework of Agenda Setting. A quantitative analysis using Content Analysis is proposed to examine the issues that were brought up by the politicians and picked up by the Malaysian daily, The Star, as reflected in the news reports on the days leading to the general election.

Keywords: Agenda setting, elections, issues, Malaysia, media

Pages: 31-47 | First Published: 1 March 2011

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SEARCH 3 (1) 2011


Television Exposure and Internet Use: Their Relationship to Political Tolerance in Egyptian Society
Shaima’a Z Zoghaib

Abstract:

Drawing on a survey of 450 Egyptians aged 18 to 70 representing different socio-economic categories and different geographical regions, this study compared the effects of television exposure and Internet use on political tolerance in Egyptian society, taking into account other social, political and psychological variables. The study also investigated the targets of intolerance and how they differed among different groups. The findings shed light on the importance of TV exposure in promoting political tolerance, in addition to the significant negative effects of threat perception and religiosity. There were no significant differences in levels of political tolerance between respondents with different demographic characteristics. The implications of the findings are discussed.

Keywords: Television esposure, Internet use, political tolerance, Egyption society.

Pages: 49-69 | First Published: 1 March 2011

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